A literary analysis of an american dream in the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald

Create your Fan Badge Criticism of the American Dream in The Great Gatsby The American Dream--as it arose in the Colonial period and developed in the nineteenth century--was based on the assumption that each person, no matter what his origins, could succeed in life on the sole basis of his or her own skill and effort. The dream was embodied in the ideal of the self-made man. The Great Gatsby is a novel about what happened to the American dream in the s, a period when the old values that gave substance to the dream had been corrupted by the vulgar pursuit of wealth.

A literary analysis of an american dream in the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald

Lori Steinbach Certified Educator F. Scott Fitzgerald manages to define, praise, and condemn what is known as the American Dream in his most successful novel, The Great Gatsby.

The novel is set inand it depicts the American Dream--and its demise--through the use of literary devices and symbols.

One literary device he uses to depict the American Dream is motif; one motif is geography as represented by East and West Egg. West Egg is where the "new rich" live, those who have made a lot of money by being entrepreneurial or criminal in the years after World War I ended.

These people are portrayed as being rather gaudy like Gatsby's pink suit and Rolls Royceshowy like Gatsby's rather ostentatious white mansionand gauche socially awkward, as Gatsby seems always to be.

A literary analysis of an american dream in the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald

It is as if they do not quite know what to do with their newly earned riches and therefore try to "copy" what they perceive to be the possessions and manners of the rich. This is a clear condemnation of the excessive materialism which was the result of pursuing the American Dream.

On the other hand, East Egg is filled with those who have always had money. While they do look like they have class, dignity, and manners things lacking in West-Eggersthey are no better in their excesses than their newly rich neighbors.

Tom and Daisy both have affairs, Jordan Baker is a cheat, Daisy kills a woman and lets someone else take the blame, and many of the East Eggers who come to Gatsby's parties bring their mistresses and act like heathens while they are there. The clear message seems to be that the result of the American Dream--wealth--causes destruction.

This is a highly symbolic novel, and Fitzgerald uses symbols to represent various aspects of the American Dream. The first is the Valley of Ashes, a place which depicts the consequences of the self-absorption of the rich.

They were careless people, Tom and Daisy--they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money of their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.

One of the results of this representative carelessness is the Valley of Ashes. The rich have made their money on industry and carelessly tossed the waste, resulting in this gray, poverty-stricken stretch of land.

The people and the place matter not at all to those who selfishly left their waste for others to live in and deal with, another consequence of the American Dream, according to Fitzgerald.

An unmistakable symbol used to depict the American Dream, as well as its demise, is the green light at the end of Daisy's dock in East Egg.

A literary analysis of an american dream in the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald

It is Gatsby's inspiration and his aspiration--the unattainable dream. When he was poor, Daisy could not marry him, so he worked hard and achieved the epitome of the American Dream.

He literally recreated himself from virtually nothing, he made a lot of money through illegal means, though no one seems to care much about thatand he surrounded himself with the material possessions which he thinks will entice Daisy to be with him. Nick philosophically compares the green light to the Pilgrims seeing America for the first time.

The dream soon dies, however. But what he did not know was that it was already behind him, somewhere in the vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.Themes Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work.

The Decline of the American Dream in the s. On the surface, The Great Gatsby is a story of the thwarted love between a man and a woman.

The main theme of the novel, however, encompasses a . In The Great Gatsby Fitzgerald offers up commentary on a variety of themes — justice, power, greed, betrayal, the American dream, and so on. Of all the themes, perhaps none is more well developed than that of social stratification.

The Great Gatsby is regarded as a brilliant piece of social. However, F. Scott Fitzgerald demonstrates his true feelings about the American Dream in his classic novel, The Great Gatsby.

Many characters in this story, such as Daisy and Tom Buchanan, Jay Gatsby, and Jordan Baker, found riches and happiness in materialistic things and people throughout this novel.

Get everything you need to know about The American Dream in The Great Gatsby. Analysis, related quotes, theme tracking. The theme of The American Dream in The Great Gatsby from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes. Sign In Sign Up. Lit. Guides. Lit.

Terms. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Upgrade to A + Download this Lit Guide. The Great Gatsby () literary criticism. Beuka, Robert. American Icon: Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby in Critical and Cultural Context (Boydell & Brewer ) [jstor book preview]..

Callahan, John F. "F. Scott Fitzgerald's Evolving American Dream: The 'Pursuit of Happiness' in The Great Gatsby, Tender is the Night, and The Last Tycoon." Twentieth Century Literature 42, 3 (Autumn ) pp The book 'The Great Gatsby' by F. Scott Fitzgerald was an 'icon of its time.' The book discusses topics that were important, controversial and interesting back in 's America.

The novel is 'an exploration of the American Dream as it exists in a corrupt period of history.'.

"Fitzgerald’s Critique of the American Dream" by Kimberly Pumphrey