A discussion on stress and chronic diseases among urban african american adolescents

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Introduction Stress can have a significant effect on an adolescent's long-term physical and mental well-being. An understanding of the role of unmanaged stress during early adolescence is critical for the prevention of chronic diseases such as depression.

A discussion on stress and chronic diseases among urban african american adolescents

Stress and chronic disease Project summary Emerging international literature suggests that psychosocial stress is an important contributor to chronic diseases and there is a large volume of research investigating this topic. Minority groups are confronted by particular stressors as a result of their disadvantaged circumstances within societies.

There is a dearth of research on the social and cultural context of stress for Indigenous peoples and hence this review sought to address two broad research questions: What evidence is there linking psychosocial tress to the development of chronic disease or the complication of its management for Indigenous peoples?

What psychosocial stress interventions have been attempted and what strategies have been effective for Indigenous peoples? Summary of project outcomes This review has demonstrated that there are clear links between stress and a range of chronic diseases for Indigenous peoples in a number of first world nations including Australiaas well as for African-Americans.

The interventions identified in this review appear to warrant further investigation, and this review has also highlighted the need to consider the theoretical issues in stress conceptualisation and measurement in both analytical and intervention studies.

There is also a need for further research in this area, including both small-scale research and more ambitious longitudinal studies. Summary of project implementation A total of 50 studies examining the relationship between stress and chronic conditions were included in the review.

Of these, 13 were conducted with Indigenous populations six in Australia and the remaining 34 with African Americans. Fifteen intervention studies were included in the review. Key findings This review identified a number of promising interventions that may be appropriate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, particularly: Group-oriented stress management and empowerment programs.

Introduction

The review also found that further research in this field is warranted, specifically: For Indigenous populations, particularly in Australia, about whom less is known in comparison with African Americans.

With children and adolescents, as chronic disease susceptibility starts early in life.

A discussion on stress and chronic diseases among urban african american adolescents

On stress buffers and exacerbators. On the mechanisms by which stress affects health. Main messages The review indicated that: Appropriate interventions to deal with stress among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians should be provided both through existing mainstream providers and the social and emotional wellbeing centres of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

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To maximise effectiveness in reducing the relative burden of chronic disease for Indigenous Australians, interventions should be preceded by culturally relevant conceptualisation and measurement of stress.

Related publications Paradies, Y.The purpose of the Shifting the Lens study was to explore perceptions of stress, sources of social support, and use of coping strategies among urban African American ninth graders.

Methods A youth-driven, mixed-method approach was used to assess teens' perceptions of stress. Exploring Stress and Coping Among Urban African American Adolescents: The Shifting the Lens Study An understanding of the role of unmanaged stress during early adolescence is critical for the prevention of chronic diseases such as depression.

Collins N, Nuriddin T, Irving S, et al. Urban stress and mental health among African . relating traumatic stress to hopelessness and risk behaviors among african american adolescents living within high poverty communities by monique mullins.

Request PDF on ResearchGate | Contextual Stress and Health Risk Behaviors Among African American Adolescents | This study examined the longitudinal association between contextual stress and health. Stress and chronic disease Project summary Emerging international literature suggests that psychosocial stress is an important contributor to chronic diseases and there is a large volume of research investigating this topic.

Exploring Stress and Coping Among Urban African American Adolescents: The Shifting the Lens Study is critical for the prevention of chronic diseases such as depression. among urban African.

Preventing Chronic Disease: April 05_